Abstracts and Introductions
Abstracts and Introductions
In this section, we will discuss how to write abstracts and introductions. Writing an abstract is one of the best tools for starting your essay,...
Read More
Reading Effectively
Reading Effectively
It sounds odd to say that you don’t know how to read academic papers. You start at the beginning, keep reading until the end—right? But the...
Read More
Logical Arguments
Logical Arguments
The structure of a philosophical argument A good philosophy paper contains an argument: "a series of claims in which one of the claims (i.e., the...
Read More
Structure
Structure
"Poorly structured" and "unstructured" are very common criticisms in feedback on essays. But what does that mean, and how should you respond? There are two...
Read More
Constructing an Argument
Constructing an Argument
Philosophers use a number of tools in constructing arguments. As a philosophy student, it is your task to identify these tools at work in philosophical...
Read More
Criticising an Argument
Criticising an Argument
  It is crucial to understand the approaches to criticising philosophical positions which philosophers employ—both to use these tools to criticise others’ work, and to...
Read More
Fallacies
Fallacies
Try the writephilosophy Fallacies quiz to see how well you understand argumentative fallacies. A fallacy is a mistake or error in reasoning. Fallacies can be...
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Editing
Editing
It is easiest to edit your work if you understand the difference between three stages in your writing process: producing a zero draft, producing a...
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WritePhilosophy.com is a resource for philosophy students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The site contains a guide to argumentative writing, philosophical terminology and written style, as well as exercises to support your learning.

The site serves as the base for the LSE Philosophy department’s course “Philosophy & Argumentative Writing” (PAW). Students should visit the PAW pages.

This project is supported by the LSE Teaching and Learning Development Fund and the LSE Department of Philosophy, Logic & Scientific Method, and managed by Chris Blunt and Rosa Runhardt.

Abstracts and Introductions

In this section, we will discuss how to write abstracts and introductions. Writing an abstract is one of the best tools for starting your essay, and for improving its argument and structure. Most often, when you get the feedback that …

Reading Effectively

It sounds odd to say that you don’t know how to read academic papers. You start at the beginning, keep reading until the end—right? But the problem of being unable to cope with academic reading is probably the most common complaint …

Logical Arguments

The structure of a philosophical argument A good philosophy paper contains an argument: “a series of claims in which one of the claims (i.e., the conclusion) is said to follow from, or be supported by, one or more of the …

Structure

“Poorly structured” and “unstructured” are very common criticisms in feedback on essays. But what does that mean, and how should you respond? There are two kinds of structure involved in your papers: The structure of the paper. The structure of …

Constructing an Argument

Philosophers use a number of tools in constructing arguments. As a philosophy student, it is your task to identify these tools at work in philosophical arguments and analyse how well they have been used, as well as using them yourself. …

Criticising an Argument

  It is crucial to understand the approaches to criticising philosophical positions which philosophers employ—both to use these tools to criticise others’ work, and to anticipate criticisms of your own work. Here, we’ll explore three common approaches to criticising philosophical …

Fallacies

Try the writephilosophy Fallacies quiz to see how well you understand argumentative fallacies. A fallacy is a mistake or error in reasoning. Fallacies can be accidental errors, or can be deliberately crafted to be misleading. Many different types of fallacy …

Editing

It is easiest to edit your work if you understand the difference between three stages in your writing process: producing a zero draft, producing a first draft, and producing a final draft. After briefly outlining the difference, we will discuss …